Caren Ware's Blog

March 7, 2014

A VAN FULL, A handful.

Filed under: Uncategorized — Caren Ware @ 5:42 pm

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IMG_3517Those who know me can only imagine a week encapsulated in a Safari van with Caren Ware!
Kind of the equivalent to being in a space capsule all together, over and out, for a week. Thank you, van full, for rightfully putting me in the shotgun seat so my energy that served me well on the track, but has a tendency to knock my camera lens out the window and fling cashews in all directions when trying to gingerly open a bag, could be corralled to one area. Toe raises, ham string curls as we stood all day gazing at amazing could be done in that front seat!! Mr. Guide Bahiti, your ride along for this week had to be an experience!
Because of Bahiti, the guide, our safari vehicle experienced a lot more feel for wildlife. Bahiti was gentle, open, and sincerely in love with his land. His ease of instruction so much a part of him. I have only found one other individual on this earth that has that natural of ease in instruction. Keegan Bradley’s father, Mark. Both, Bahiti in Tanzania, and Mark, on the ski slopes of Jackson, Wyoming or golf courses across America, are professional guides and instructors. Every moment has a moment for instruction for them. It is just in their cells. Tidbits of knowledge are given in a way that guide you to understanding the wide picture because of being feed in small, understandable, chewable pieces. In Jackson, I was skiing one hundred percent different in half a day. In a week with Bahiti jabbering about culture, words, sayings, animals, their habits, their habitat…I, too, deepened a love for the diversity and enormity of this land. And I couldn’t help welling up a grander reverence and respect for THE Creator. I thank these gentlemen for their gift of instruction. I learn like a sponge this way.
Bahiti, would point out bushes with torns and ants and how plants protected themselves. How giraffes could eat around plants other animals could not. He would grab seeds and talk of the medicinal services the plant could be used for. We learned about white breasted KooKoo Birds, Agarma lizards, Superb Starlings, Saddle Billed Stokes, Grey Crowned Cranes, Kori Bastards… all pronounced with a Swahili twang. First hand knowledge is always better than the book. Thus, the reason for me to tell you I regret not bringing my college son. This is such a unique, unusual place like no other on earth. It will brand shared experiences…a price tag never too high. I am going to campaign that all of you out there give this experience a try… part some time in your life and come, but don’t leave home with the most valuable asset to share it with. Make that a part of the plan. Duel it with someone special. For me, I will have to do this over again, because I SO HOPE to share it with my young adult children.

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